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Growing Winter Wheat with SabrEx™ (Updated)

June 18th, 2013

The benefits of planting winter wheat are no secret. Whether growing winter wheat as a cash grain or a cover crop for soil protection, there are many benefits in treating seeds with SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals that may not be as obvious. We’ve put together this fact sheet to help explain why SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals will give your crop an extra advantage:

How SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals works:

SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals is a formulation of two (2) specific and carefully selected patent pending, proprietary strains of Trichoderma. The Trichoderma colonizes with the plants’ root system and develops a symbiotic relationship with the plant, feeding off the starches and sugars the plant produces. In turn, the plant benefits from the Trichoderma as they exude enzymes and proteins for the plants use.  As a result, the plant produces a larger root system, induces resistance to stresses like diseases and improves its nitrogen and water use efficiencies, resulting in higher yields.

Growing Winter Wheat as a Cash Crop:

The number one benefit of harvesting winter wheat treated with SabrEx™ is the increased yields. Over the past 4 years, SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals has averaged 5.3 bushels per acre over untreated crops.

Planting Winter Wheat as a Cover Crop:

Because SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals produces a larger root system and improves nitrogen efficiency, the treated crop will improve topsoil tilth and Nitrogen scavenging. To view a comparison of root systems untreated and treated with SabrEx™, watch the video below.

Treating Other Crops:

SabrEx for Wheat and Cereals can be used on the following crops: Wheat, Rye, Barley, Sorghum, Oats, Spelt, and Triticale.

Application of SabrEx™:

SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals is available in three (3) formulations: SabrEx™ PB (Planter Box), SabrEx™ HC (High Concentrate) and SabrEx™ LQ (Liquid).

SabrEx™ PB is a talc/graphite formulation that can be applied directly to the seed at planting at a rate of 1 oz. /50 lbs. of seed. One pail will treat 48 units of wheat with 6 pails/case treating 288 units of seed.

SabrEx™ HC is a high concentrate formulated for commercial treaters only with a low application rate of .25 oz. /100 lbs. of seed.  One pail will treat 240 units of wheat with 6 pails/case treating 1440 units of seed.

SabrEx™ LQ is a liquid high concentrate formulation for commercial treaters only. It has a low application rate of .25 oz./100 lbs. of seed. One 32 oz. jug will treat 256 units of wheat. There are 8 jugs/case that will treat 2048 units of seed

Return on Investment:

Typically ABM’s suggested retail cost for SabrEx for Wheat and Cereals PB is around $2.50/50# unit of seed.  SabrEx for Wheat and Cereals HC retails around $1.04/unit of seed.  LQ, the liquid formulation, has a suggested retail price of around $1.51/unit of seed. Prices may vary. With today’s wheat market, on average, a farmer can typically see a net return on investment of up to $40/acre.

Treating seeds with SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals will clearly improve your crops output this winter. For more information and where to buy SabrEx™ for Wheat and Cereals, please contact your sales rep by clicking HERE.

The importance of Inoculation

April 23rd, 2013

It is fairly common knowledge that inoculation is a benefit to a soybean crop.  However, do we really know why it is so important?  How does an inoculant really help the plant?  Is it worth the extra cost?  Often we are simply instructed to sprinkle some product in the seed box and be on our merry way, but we do not really have an understanding of what that product does.  As you will soon see, the science behind inoculation is really quite fascinating, and deserves to be studied further.

Soybean, as a legume, has the ability to fix its own nitrogen, but it can’t really do it all on its own.  It needs the help of a special type of bacteria: Bradyrhizobium Japonicum.  If a soybean plant is to grow to its full potential, it must be surrounded by these beneficial bacteria.  Soil already has some bacteria present in it, but it is often less than the plant is able to fully utilize.  So, to push the soybean plant to its maximum production capacity, inoculants are often incorporated on the seed to ensure that there are enough bacteria to help the plant meet its full potential.  The inoculant is applied at the seed box or in the furrow, placing the B. Japonicum in a usable area around the plant.  The bacteria aid the plant in producing nodules, or sites on the root that are responsible for fixing nitrogen.  As the plant grows, it continually benefits from its mutual relationship with the bacteria, resulting in a stronger, more productive crop.

This health and newfound productivity of the crop is what makes inoculation worth the extra cost.  When you apply an inoculant to your beans, you should expect a yield increase that more than pays for the input cost of the inoculant itself.  Studies have proven that these expectations are totally realistic.  One study, referenced in an article from North Dakota State University states that: “The Carrington Research Extension Center has conducted research on soybean seed inoculants (Figure 3). The 13-year average shows a significant 2.1 bushel per acre and a 0.9% protein advantage with inoculation compared with the untreated check.”  Research from the University of Wisconsin Extension also found that, “In 1996, replicated field trials were done in Fond du Lac County where we evaluated inoculant use on two first-year soybean fields that were planted no-till. In one field, soybean yields increased from 34 to 49 bushels per acre by using an inoculant, while the other trial showed a five bushel per acre increase.”  These two studies prove that inoculation pays off through significant yield increases, and they are only two among many.

The inoculants that we offer here at ABM provide all of these benefits to your soybean crop.  In fact, our newest inoculant product, Marauder, was found to have a 2 bushel advantage over the competition based on 2012 research.  As you put seed in the ground this spring, be sure to inoculate with the best.  Take a look at our Crop/Products tab to search for the ABM inoculant that works best for you!

 

 

Soil Fungi Give Added Benefits to No-Till Farmers

March 18th, 2013

If you have read about our products containing the soil fungus Trichoderma, you know that a strong soil fungi population in your fields can lead to healthier, more productive plants.  Trichoderma provides multiple benefits to its host plant.  It enhances the anti-oxidative potential of the host.  The fungus aids the plant in building disease resistance.   It also enhances the uptake of water and nutrients while increasing the photosynthetic capabilities of the host plant.  As you can see, soil fungi have the ability to make a crop more productive, but did you know that these fungi can provide added benefits to no-till producers?

According to an article from the Ohio State University Extension, soil fungi have features that are specifically beneficial to farmers using no-till methods.  One such feature is the fungi’s ability to produce glomalin.  Glomalin is a sticky substance that surrounds microaggregate soil particles and glues them together to form macroaggregate soil particles.  These larger soil particles allow increased water infiltration and soil water holding capacity.  The macroaggregate particles also decrease soil compaction, as they cannot be as densely packed as microaggregates.

Soil fungi greatly increase the surface area for plant roots and efficiently transport nutrients back to the plant.  The fungal hyphae (fungus filaments similar to a root hair) can explore up to 20% of the soil volume due to their small size compared to only 1% by root hairs.  In no-till soil matrices where the soil has not been broken up by tillage, this enhanced penetration can increase the plant’s ability to collect and utilize nutrients.

Soil fungi in no-till fields also have a better chance of surviving and benefiting next year’s crop.  Soil fungi often have enough resilience to convert from one resting stage to another when nutrient levels are low.  Fungal hyphae must be in close contact with living or dead organic soil residues to absorb nutrient and survive.  If a farmer keeps root systems intact over winter, or plants cover crops, the fungi may be able to latch on to these plants and remain active until the next growing season.

Soil fungi like the Trichoderma in our iGET technology have obvious benefits for plants in any growing conditions, and this research shows that it can have even more for plants in no-till soil conditions.

For more information on Trichoderma and our iGET technology, see http://abm1st.com/innovation/iget .

Information in this article was found at http://www.compostjunkie.com/support-files/the_role_of_soil_fungus.pdf.

Drought Reduces Soybean Rhizobia Cells in Soil

January 21st, 2013

In keeping with ABM’s mission of educating the farmer, this blog post was drafted to address the effects of last year’s (2012) drought on Bradyrhizobia populations for the upcoming planting season.

An article published in the August 14- August 20 edition of The Ohio State University C.O.R.N. Newsletter, titled “Survival of Soybean Rhizobia Cells in Soil,” written by Jim Beuerlein and Harold Watters, advises inoculating soybeans and other legume seeds heading into the 2013 planting season due to reduced rhizobia populations following the 2012 drought.

In response to this perfectly logical advice, Dan Custis, CEO of ABM states, “The 2012 growing season was a challenge, to say the least, for the American Farmer. Here in the Mid-West, we experienced the hottest summer on record. This put tremendous pressure on crops above ground and even more pressure on the microbes in the rhizosphere, or root zone. Specifically, the Bradyrhizobia that the soybean depends upon to nodulate the root system were greatly reduced.”

Below are the comments of Dr. David Kuykendall, retired USDA Senior Research Scientist and Senior Consulting Scientist with ABM:

“As an expert I was asked to comment on the advisability of inoculating soybeans in 2013 due to reduced survival of soybean-nodulating Bradyrhizobium japonicum in field soil following the 2012 drought. A recent article by Jim Beuerlein and Harold Watters described how the widespread drought in crop production areas of the central U.S. in 2012 have justifiably caused concern for the crop production forecast for this year, 2013. I agree fully that it seems extremely likely that the dry soil surface conditions and high soil temperatures experienced over broad areas were harsh enough to have dramatically reduced useful populations of beneficial soil bacteria known microbiologically as B. japonicum.

“Soybean-nodulating Bradyrhizobium bacterial cells persist or survive well in moist soil and soil temperatures below 90 degrees F.  The drought in 2012 caused the top half of a foot (6 inches) of soil to stay extremely dry and hot for a prolonged period.  Such stressful environmental conditions cause the death of 99.9% or more of the bradyrhizobia cells.  Therefore, it is reasonable to suppose that normal populations of millions of soybean-nodulating bacteria per ounce of soil could have likely been reduced in population size to only as few as a hundred, or perhaps a thousand, residual soil rhizobia cells remaining per ounce of soil in many Midwestern soybean fields in 2012 due to the drought.

“Although some cells survive such extreme environmental conditions, Bauerlein and Watters reasonably surmise that those cells will have likely drifted genetically into “survival mode” and, as is typical of persistent feral populations of soybean-nodulating bacteria, are likely lacking in potential to reduce nitrogen into a form utilizable by soybean plants. They conclude ‘That means the surviving rhizobia population will likely be less productive next year than in previous years. That reduced productivity should translate into increased yield responses to inoculating soybeans and other legume seeds in the spring of 2013.’ Indeed inoculation of soybeans with a good genetically enhanced commercial inoculant would be particularly well advised this year, more so than any other year that most can recall.” Dr. L. David Kuykendall, Senior Consulting Scientist, Advanced Biological Marketing.

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*Dr. L. David Kuykendall is a Consulting Senior Scientist working with ABM in the development of microbiological technologies. His professional career has spanned more than 36 years, 25 of which with the USDA as a Senior Research Scientist Earning a PhD in Microbiology in 1976 at the age of 23, Dr. Kuykendall has authored 107 scientific journal articles and book chapters. His published work has received more than 1,500 literature citations.

Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans FAQ

January 18th, 2013

What is Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans is an inoculant, or seed treatment, containing a specially formulated blend of Excalibre® Soybean inoculant plus SabrEx™ Root Inoculant formulated in a talc-graphite carrier. Graph-Ex SA™ is comprised of both proprietary beneficial bacteria (Bradyrhizobia) and beneficial fungi (Trichoderma) that provide a more efficient use of soil nutrients for the host plant.

What is rhizobia and how does it work?

Bradyrhizobia are soil bacteria that fix nitrogen after becoming established inside root nodules of legumes. Rhizobia require a plant host; they cannot independently fix nitrogen.

At ABM, our proprietary Bradyrhizobia for soybeans is specific to these crops in helping the plant to establish nitrogen fixing nodules that will convert atmospheric nitrogen to nitrogen that is useable by the plant.

What does the SA mean?

The SA means that ABM has also added our proprietary, patent pending Trichoderma strain found in SabrEx™ root inoculant found to be beneficial in soybean production.

What is Trichoderma and how does it work?

Trichoderma is a fungi that is found in soils all over the world.  There are thousands of known Trichoderma strains but only a few are beneficial to plants.  Trichoderma colonizes with the plants root system and develops a symbiotic relationship with the plant.  The Trichoderma feed from the starches and sugars produced by the plant; while exuding beneficial enzymes and proteins for the host plant. As a result the plant produces a larger root system, improves resistance to stresses such as diseases, and improves its nitrogen and water use efficiency, thus resulting in higher yields.

ABM, in working with Dr. Gary Harman of Cornell University, has developed the technology to isolate and identify specific strains of beneficial Trichoderma.  Once the strains are identified and isolated, ABM tests each strain, or combinations of strains, with various crops to determine which crop receives the most benefit from each strain of Trichoderma.  After thorough testing, a formulation is produced and brought to market to benefit farmers.

How do I apply Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans to my seed?

GraphEx-SA™ for Soybeans is a planter box treatment that can be added just before planting at the planter box.  It consists of a talc/graphite formulation as the carrier for the Bradyrhizobia and Trichoderma.   You will add .5 oz. of Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans to every unit of seed you add to your drill/planter.  Make sure to mix Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans thoroughly with the seed. It should be noted; the talc/graphite formulation also helps to lubricate your planter equipment and also helps provide seed flowability.  This is important as it will minimize seed hang-ups in your equipment and reduces the wear and tear on your units.

Under what environmental conditions should I use more than the recommended rate of Graph-Ex SA™ on my soybeans?

To maximize yield potential: ABM recommends a double (2x) inoculant rate when planting soybeans under the following soil conditions:

1)     Soil that has not hosted the specific legume for more than 3 years.

2)     Soil pH of less than 5.8 or greater than 8.5

3)     Organic matter less than 1%

4)     Drought or flooding

5)     Soil Temperatures exceeding 80 degrees F

6)     Eroded soil

7)     Use of soil treatments and chemicals injurious to soil bacteria and inoculants

What if my soybeans are already treated with an inoculant, can I still use Graph-Ex SA™ for my double rate?

Yes.  Using a different source of inoculant is a good choice.

Once I apply the Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans to my seed, how long can I wait to plant the seed?

Once you have applied Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans to your seed it is best to plant it immediately.  Occasionally, delays can be expected in farming, however after 72 hours you will need to re-treat your seed with Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans.

What if my seed is already treated with insecticide and/or fungicide, can I still use Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans?

Yes.  Apply Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans to your seed only after the pesticide products have dried.

Where can I get Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans?

ABM does not sell directly to the grower. You can contact your Seed Company, local ag retailer or co-op to purchase ABM products. Still can’t find it? Feel free to give us a call at 866-335-5994 and we will point you to the nearest location for purchase.

How much does Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans cost?

Typically ABM’s suggested retail cost for Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans is around $3.35/unit of seed.  However, prices may vary.

How is the Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans packaged?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans is packaged in 25 oz. pouches.  One pouch will treat 50-units of seed.  One case contains 6 pouches that will treat a total of 300-units units of seed.

What if I don’t use all of the Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans that I purchased this year?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Soybeans is good for one season. What you don’t use will not be good for the next year.  Each package is stamped with its expiration date.

 

 

Alfalfa Inoculant

January 7th, 2013

Why you want to over treat alfalfa.

The one crop that is probably the most difficult to establish a good stand and maintain that good stand for 3-5 years is alfalfa.  There are many factors that may contribute to good stand establishment such as seed bed preparation, good seed to soil contact at planting, fertility, weed control, insect control, etc.  Probably the most overlooked contribution to good stand establishment is the success of good nodulation on the alfalfa plant.

When farmers are planting alfalfa they often neglect to consider what they need to do to assist the alfalfa in establishing good nodulation.  The nodulation process is key in assisting the plant to develop nodules that will help convert atmospheric nitrogen to a form of nitrogen that is usable by the alfalfa plant. Since Alfalfa is a legume crop, this process is similar to the nodulation needed for healthy growth of the soybean plant.  However, the Rhizobia found in the soils for soybeans are not the same Rhizobia that are needed for alfalfa.  The soybean requires the species Brady rhizobium japonicum while the alfalfa plant requires Sinorhizobium meliloti.  Therefore, it is economically important that alfalfa seed be inoculated prior to planting to assist the plant in establishing beneficial nodules.  Considerations need to be made by the farmer to determine how their alfalfa is inoculated.

First, we must consider where alfalfa seed is produced: in the western arid states. There it is harvested, graded, treated with insecticide/fungicide, and sometimes inoculated before going into the bag.  Second, when the seed is shipped back to the eastern states it is often during the hotter months of the year, July or August.  Lastly, take into consideration that inoculants are living biologicals that do not survive well when temperatures rise above 80° F.  Let’s think about this; this is pre-inoculated seed that was loaded into semi-trucks and shipped across the mid-west for 2-3 days in July and August in a hot truck before it reaches its destination in a seed warehouse.  Once in the warehouse the pre inoculated alfalfa seed must then be stored properly to maintain inoculant viability. Whether or not it is stored at the correct temperature is up to the individual warehouse. Regardless, the inoculant is most likely already degraded by the time it reaches the warehouse.

In 2012 ABM conducted a research trial in Wisconsin to determine the effectiveness of pre-inoculated alfalfa seed versus the same alfalfa seed “over treated” with Graph-Ex SA™ for Alfalfa just prior to planting.  It was determined that one year old pre inoculated alfalfa seed yielded 3% less on the first cutting and 5% less on the second cutting when compared to the same inoculated seed “over treated” with fresh Graph-Ex SA™ for Alfalfa.  Additionally, alfalfa seed that was 4 years old, pre inoculated, yielded 15% less on the first cutting and 17% less on the second cutting when compared to the same inoculated seed “over treated” with fresh Graph-Ex SA™ for Alfalfa.

When purchasing Alfalfa seed, you will want to know if it is pre inoculated and where it came from.  You will also want to know how long it’s been since the seed was treated with a pre inoculant.  Finally, you will want to know if it was stored in cold storage during the hot summer months.  Based on this information you will want to consider treating your alfalfa seed with Graph-Ex SA™ for Alfalfa at planting.

Graph-Ex SA™ for Alfalfa/Clover contains a specially formulated blend of Excalibre® Alfalfa/Clover Inoculant plus SabrEx™ Root Inoculant formulated in a talc-graphite carrier.

To learn more about Graph-Ex SA™ for Alfalfa, contact your local ABM representative by clicking here.

ABM Names Dr. Gary Harman Chief Science Officer

December 5th, 2012

Dr. Gary Harman, pictured right. George Collins, COO, pictured left.

As of December 1, 2012, ABM is excited to announce that we have appointed Dr. Gary Harman as our Chief Science Officer. His contributions to the agricultural community have been remarkable and we look forward to unraveling the endless possibilities of improving and discovering new technologies available to the grower.

Dr. Harman has spent the past 42 years as a Professor at Cornell University dedicating his life’s work to the development of microbial technologies to enhance plant growth and productivity; Including biological control of plant diseases, enhanced resistance to stress, improved nitrogen use efficiency and increased yields, and development of products using agricultural waste products for environmental remediation. He has authored two books including Trichoderma and Gliocladium, co-authored by Christian Kubick of the Technical University in Vienna, Austria, nearly 150 scientific papers, and about 20 patents or patent applications.

In working with Professor Gary Harman of Cornell University, ABM has developed the technology to isolate and identify specific strains of beneficial Trichoderma.  In that work, many thousands of strains were produced and screened over a period of more than 30 years.  ABM’s strains are the very best from this large effort, headed by the foremost leader in Trichoderma research: Dr. Gary Harman.

To view Dr. Gary Harman’s credentials, please click here.

Naturall™ for Vegetables FAQ

November 27th, 2012

What is Naturall™ for Vegetables?

Naturall™ for Vegetables is an inoculant, or seed treatment, containing proprietary and patent pending biologicals called Trichoderma that colonize the root system of plants.  Crop stress such as disease and dry weather can be alleviated, and often systemically so that root colonization of the treatment benefits the physiology of the whole plant resulting in higher yields.

What is Trichoderma and how does it work?

Trichoderma is a fungi that is found in soils all over the world.  There are thousands of known Trichoderma strains but only a few are beneficial to plants.  Trichoderma colonizes with the plants root system and develops a symbiotic relationship with the plant.  The Trichoderma feed from the starches and sugars produced by the plant while exuding beneficial enzymes and proteins for the host plants use. As a result the plant produces a larger root system, improves resistance to stresses such as diseases, and improves its nitrogen and water use efficiency, thus resulting in higher yields.

ABM, in working with Dr. Gary Harman of Cornell University, has developed the technology to isolate and identify specific strains of beneficial Trichoderma.  Once the strains are identified and isolated, ABM tests each strain with various crops to determine which crop receives the most benefit from each strain of Trichoderma.  After thorough testing, a formulation is produced and brought to market to benefit farmers.

What seed products can Naturall for Vegetables be used with?

Naturall™ for Vegetables can be used on many types of vegetables such as Cucurbits, Leafy Vegetables and Cole Crops, Bulb Crops, Root Crops, and Tuber Crops.  See the label for a detailed listing of specific vegetable crops.

How do I apply Naturall™ for Vegetables to my seed?

Naturall™ for Vegetables comes in two different formulations:

Naturall™ for Vegetables PB is a planter box treatment that can be added just before planting at the planter box. It consists of a talc/graphite formulation as the carrier for the Trichoderma.   Specific rates for each vegetable crop can be seen on the Naturall™ for Vegetable label.  Make sure to mix the Naturall™ for Vegetables PB thoroughly with the seed. It should be noted; The talc/graphite formulation also helps to lubricate your planter equipment and also helps provide seed flowability.  Naturall™ for Vegetables PB will not replace your talc or graphite that you’ve been using, however it will complement your treatment.

Naturall™ for Vegetables HC is a high concentrate formulation specifically formulated for transplant crops.  It can be applied in-furrow or as a root dip, with or without a starter solution prior to transplanting.  When using water, use only non-chlorinated water.  See Naturall™ for Vegetables label for specific crop rates.

How is Naturall™ for Vegetables packaged?

Naturall™ for Vegetables PB is packaged in 16 oz. pouches that include a measuring scoop.  One pouch can treat up to 200 lbs. of seed depending on the crop.  One case contains 6 pouches. Naturall™ for Vegetables HC comes in two package sizes:  4 oz. and 16 oz. pouches. There are 12-4 oz. pouches in a case and 6-16 oz. pouches in a case.

How much does Naturall™ for Vegetables cost?

Typically ABM’s suggested retail cost for a 16 oz. pouch of Naturall™ for Vegetables PB is around $117/pouch, the Naturall for Vegetables HC 4 oz. pouches is around $21.50/pouch and the Naturall™ for Vegetables HC 16 oz. pouch is around $156.17/pouch.  Cost per acre will vary with different vegetables and planting rates.  Prices may vary.

Where can I buy Naturall™ for Vegetables?

Ask your vegetable seed supplier, or see your local ag retailer or co-op. Still can’t find it? Give ABM a call at 866-335-5994 and we’ll point you in the right direction.

What if I don’t use all of the Naturall™ for Vegetables this year?

Naturall™ for Vegetables PB and HC have a two year expiration date in the container.  You will need to store the unused product in a cool dry place until next season.  Each package is stamped with its expiration date for your convenience.

Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans FAQ

November 27th, 2012

What is Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans is an inoculant, or seed treatment, containing a specially formulated blend of Excalibre® Dry Beans Inoculant plus SabrEx™ Root Inoculant formulated in a talc-graphite carrier. Graph-Ex SA™ is comprised of both beneficial bacteria (Rhizobia) and beneficial fungi (Trichoderma) that provide a more efficient use of soil nutrients for the host plant.

What are Rhizobia and how do they work?

Rhizobia are soil bacteria that fix nitrogen after becoming established inside root nodules of legumes. Rhizobia require a plant host; they cannot independently fix nitrogen.

At ABM, our proprietary Rhizobia for dry beans is specific to these crops in helping the plant to establish nitrogen fixing nodules that will convert atmospheric nitrogen to nitrogen that is useable by the plant.  The Rhizobia in Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans is a different type of Rhizobia than is used for soybeans.

What does the SA mean?

The SA means that ABM has also added our proprietary, patent pending Trichoderma strain found in SabrEx root inoculant found to be beneficial in dry bean production.

What is Trichoderma and how does it work?

Trichoderma is a fungi that is found in soils all over the world.  There are thousands of known Trichoderma strains but only a few are beneficial to plants.  Trichoderma colonizes with the plants root system and develops a symbiotic relationship with the plant.  The Trichoderma feed from the starches and sugars produced by the plant while exuding beneficial enzymes and proteins for the host plants use. As a result the plant produces a larger root system, improves resistance to stresses such as diseases, and improves its nitrogen and water use efficiency, thus resulting in higher yields.

ABM, in working with Dr. Gary Harman of Cornell University, has developed the technology to isolate and identify specific strains of beneficial Trichoderma.  Once the strains are identified and isolated, ABM tests each strain with various crops to determine which crop receives the most benefit from each strain of Trichoderma.  After thorough testing, a formulation is produced and brought to market to benefit farmers.

What specific variety of dry beans does Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans Treat?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans contains the Rhizobia species Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli and will effectively nodulate Black beans, Cranberry beans, Field/canning beans, Garden or string beans, Great Northern beans, Kidney beans, Navy beans, Pink beans, Pinto beans, Scarlet runner beans, Snap beans, and Wax beans.

How do I apply Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans to my seed?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans is a planter box treatment that can be added just before planting at the planter box.  It consists of a talc/graphite formulation as the carrier for the Rhizobia and Trichoderma.   You will add .5 oz. of Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans to every 50 lbs.of seed you add to your drill/planter.  Make sure to mix Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans thoroughly with the seed. It should be noted; The talc/graphite formulation also helps to lubricate your planter equipment and also helps provide seed flowability.  This is important as it will minimize seed hang-ups in your equipment and reduces the wear and tear on your units.

Once I apply the Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans to my seed, how long can I wait to plant the seed?

Once you have applied Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans to your seed it is best to plant it immediately.  Occasionally, delays can be expected in farming, however after 24 hours you will need to re-treat your seed with Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans.

What if my seed is already treated with insecticide and/or fungicide, can I still use Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans?

Yes.  Apply Graph-Ex SA™ Dry Beans to your seed only after the pesticide products have dried.

Where can I get Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans?

ABM does not sell directly to the grower. You can contact your Seed Company, local ag retailer or co-op to purchase ABM products. Still can’t find it? Feel free to give us a call at 866-335-5994 and we will point you to the nearest location for purchase.

How much does Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans cost?

Typically ABM’s suggested retail cost for Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans is around $3.35/50# unit of seed.  However, prices may vary.

How is the Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans packaged?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans is packaged in 25 oz. pouches.  One pouch will treat 50-50# of seed.  One case contains 6 pouches that will treat a total of 300-50# units of seed.

What if I don’t use all of the Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans that I purchased this year?

Graph-Ex SA™ for Dry Beans is only good for one season so what you don’t use will not be good for the next year.  Each package is stamped with its expiration date.  for Dry Beans is only good for one season so what you don’t use will not be good for the next year.  Each package is stamped with its expiration date.

SabrEx™ for Corn FAQ

November 26th, 2012

 

What is SabrEx™ for Corn?

SabrEx™ for Corn is an inoculant, or seed treatment, applied to the seed before planting. The seed treatment is a unique formulation of two (2) carefully selected, specific, patent pending, proprietary biological fungi strains called Trichoderma.

What seed products can SabrEx™ for Corn be used on?

SabrEx™ for Corn can be used on commercial corn, sweet corn, and popcorn.

What is Trichoderma and how does it work?

Trichoderma is a fungi that is found in soils all over the world.  There are thousands of known Trichoderma strains but only a few are beneficial to plants.  Trichoderma colonizes with the plants root system and develops a symbiotic relationship with the plant.  The Trichoderma feed from the starches and sugars produced by the plant while exuding beneficial enzymes and proteins for the host plants use. As a result the plant produces a larger root system, improves resistance to stresses such as diseases, and improves its nitrogen and water use efficiency, thus resulting in higher yields.

ABM, in working with Dr. Gary Harman of Cornell University, has developed the technology to isolate and identify specific strains of beneficial Trichoderma.  Once the strains are identified and isolated, ABM tests each strain with various crops to determine which crop receives the most benefit from each strain of Trichoderma.  After thorough testing, a formulation is produced and brought to market to benefit farmers.

What kind of yield response can I expect with using SabrEx™ for Corn?

Over the past 3 years, in over 181 trials, SabrEx™ for Corn has been averaging 7.97 bushels/acre higher yield than untreated plots.  In 2012, even with the drought, we are seeing a higher yield response.  With today’s corn market at an average of $7.00/bushel, a farmer can typically see a net return on investment of up to $51/acre.

How do I apply SabrEx™ for Corn to my seed?

SabrEx™ for Corn is available in two different formulations:

SabrEx™ for Corn PB is a planter box treatment that can be added just before planting at the planter box.  It consists of a talc/graphite formulation as the carrier for the Trichoderma.   You will add .5 oz. of SabrEx™ for Corn PB for every 80K kernel unit of seed you add to your planter.  Make sure to mix the SabrEx™ for Corn PB into the seed corn thoroughly. It should be noted; The talc/graphite formulation also helps to lubricate your planter equipment and also helps provide seed flowability.  SabrEx™ for Corn PB will not replace your talc or graphite that you’ve been using, however it will complement your treatment.

SabrEx™ for Corn HC is a high concentrate formulation specifically formulated for commercial seed treaters and seed companies.  It has a low application rate of 0.25 oz./80K kernels of seed.  Once on the seed, SabrEx™ for Corn HC will not expire for two years.  Applying SabrEx™ for Corn HC to the seed in the bag is a huge convenience to the grower.  The farmer will simply add the seed to the planter and plant as usual.

Where can I get SabrEx™ for Corn?

You can contact your Seed Company as many seed companies now apply SabrEx™ to their corn in the bag. To find SabrEx™ PB please contact your local ag retailer or co-op or give ABM a call at 866-335-5994.

How much does SabrEx™ for Corn cost?

Typically ABM’s suggested retail cost for SabrEx™ for Corn is around $4.23/acre when planting at a rate of 28,000 plants per acre.  Prices may vary. Cost per acre will vary with different planting rates.

How is SabrEx™ for Corn packaged?

SabrEx™ for Corn PB is packaged in 12 oz. pouches that include a measuring scoop.  One pouch will treat 24 units of seed.  One case contains 6 pouches that will treat a total of 144 units of seed.

SabrEx™ for Corn HC is packaged in 10 oz. pouches that will treat 40 units of seed.  There are 6 pouches in a case that will treat a total of 240 units of seed.

What if I don’t use all of the SabrEx™ for Corn PB this year?

SabrEx™ for Corn PB and HC have a two-year expiration date both on the seed and in the container.  You will need to store the unused product in a cool dry place until next season.  Each package is stamped with its expiration date.

I heard the buzz about SabrEx™ for Corn’s resistance to the 2012 drought, where are the pictures?

Right here: Click this link.

Where can I find the label and MSDS for SabrEx™ for Corn?

Right here: Click this link.

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